spaceexp:

Exoplanets known so far per category. The total is 990 worlds but it is still growing

spaceexp:

Exoplanets known so far per category. The total is 990 worlds but it is still growing

theolduvaigorge:

Having the stomach for it: a contribution to Neanderthal diets?

  • by Laura T. Buck and Chris B. Stringer

Due to the central position of diet in determining ecology and behaviour, much research has been devoted to uncovering Neanderthal subsistence strategies. This has included indirect studies inferring diet from habitat reconstruction, ethnographic analogy, or faunal assemblages, and direct methods, such as dental wear and isotope analyses. Recently, studies of dental calculus have provided another rich source of dietary evidence, with much potential. One of the most interesting results to come out of calculus analyses so far is the suggestion that Neanderthals may have been eating non-nutritionally valuable plants for medicinal reasons. Here we offer an alternative hypothesis for the occurrence of non-food plants in Neanderthal calculus based on the modern human ethnographic literature: the consumption of herbivore stomach contents” (read more/not open access).

(Source: Quaternary Science Reviews, in press 2013; top image: Maurico Anton via Fine Art Today; bottom image: Dentistry Today)

(via scientificillustration)

spaceexp:

Hyperion Approach

spaceexp:

Hyperion Approach

newyorker:


Jon Lee Anderson writes about the inevitable discrepancies and uncanny parallels between real life and “Homeland”’s fictional representation of Venezuela’s Tower of David: http://nyr.kr/17Ce7ge

“In real life, as in ‘Homeland,’ the Tower is a symbol of contemporary Venezuela’s broken dreams and, more pointedly, of the failure of the late Hugo Chávez’s experiment in socialism, which he called his ‘Bolivarian revolution.’”

Photograph: Kent Smith

newyorker:

Jon Lee Anderson writes about the inevitable discrepancies and uncanny parallels between real life and “Homeland”’s fictional representation of Venezuela’s Tower of David: http://nyr.kr/17Ce7ge

In real life, as in ‘Homeland,’ the Tower is a symbol of contemporary Venezuela’s broken dreams and, more pointedly, of the failure of the late Hugo Chávez’s experiment in socialism, which he called his ‘Bolivarian revolution.’

Photograph: Kent Smith

(Source: newyorker.com)

politicalprof:

What kind of conspiracy theorist are you?
ht: Ethan Siegel, Starts With A Bang

politicalprof:

What kind of conspiracy theorist are you?

ht: Ethan Siegel, Starts With A Bang

bluepueblo:

Autumn Forest, South Korea
photo via maegan

bluepueblo:

Autumn Forest, South Korea

photo via maegan

bluepueblo:

Lake Dock, Seattle, Washington
photo via ollie

bluepueblo:

Lake Dock, Seattle, Washington

photo via ollie

rhamphotheca:

Fish Fossil Has Oldest Known Face, May Influence Evolution
The 419-million-year-old fossil has the same jawbones as vertebrates.
by Brian Handwerk
Scientists have found the oldest face—and it’s a fish. 
The 419-million-year-old fish fossil could help explain when and how vertebrates, including humans, acquired our faces—suggesting a far more primitive origin for this critical feature of our success, a new study says.
“Entelognathus primordialis is one of the earliest, and certainly the most primitive, fossil fish that has the same jawbones as modern bony fishes and land vertebrates including ourselves,” said study co-author Min Zhu of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing.
"The human jaw is quite directly connected to the jaw of this fish, and that’s what makes it so interesting."
The bones comprising the fish’s cheek and jaws appear essentially the same as those found in modern bony vertebrates, including humans, Zhu added. Because it boasts maxilla and mandible much like our own, the fish may be the earliest known creature with what we’d recognize as a face…
(read more: National Geographic News)
illustration by Brian Choo

rhamphotheca:

Fish Fossil Has Oldest Known Face, May Influence Evolution

The 419-million-year-old fossil has the same jawbones as vertebrates.

by Brian Handwerk

Scientists have found the oldest face—and it’s a fish.

The 419-million-year-old fish fossil could help explain when and how vertebrates, including humans, acquired our faces—suggesting a far more primitive origin for this critical feature of our success, a new study says.

Entelognathus primordialis is one of the earliest, and certainly the most primitive, fossil fish that has the same jawbones as modern bony fishes and land vertebrates including ourselves,” said study co-author Min Zhu of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing.

"The human jaw is quite directly connected to the jaw of this fish, and that’s what makes it so interesting."

The bones comprising the fish’s cheek and jaws appear essentially the same as those found in modern bony vertebrates, including humans, Zhu added. Because it boasts maxilla and mandible much like our own, the fish may be the earliest known creature with what we’d recognize as a face…

(read more: National Geographic News)

illustration by Brian Choo

(via scientificillustration)

utcjonesobservatory:

Glowing Interstellar Grains
This image of the star formation region NGC 6334 is one of the first scientific images from the ArTeMiS instrument on APEX. The picture shows the glow detected at a wavelength of 0.35 millimetres coming from dense clouds of interstellar dust grains. The new observations from ArTeMiS show up in orange and have been superimposed on a view of the same region taken in near-infrared light by ESO’s VISTA telescope at Paranal.
Image: ArTeMiS team/Ph. André, M. Hennemann, V. Revéret et al./ESO/J. Emerson/VISTA Acknowledgment: Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit [high-resolution]
Caption: ESO

utcjonesobservatory:

Glowing Interstellar Grains

This image of the star formation region NGC 6334 is one of the first scientific images from the ArTeMiS instrument on APEX. The picture shows the glow detected at a wavelength of 0.35 millimetres coming from dense clouds of interstellar dust grains. The new observations from ArTeMiS show up in orange and have been superimposed on a view of the same region taken in near-infrared light by ESO’s VISTA telescope at Paranal.

Image: ArTeMiS team/Ph. André, M. Hennemann, V. Revéret et al./ESO/J. Emerson/VISTA Acknowledgment: Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit [high-resolution]

Caption: ESO